Why is Sleep so Important?

 

Sleep, a quality that deteriorates with age, plays a very important role in the amount Human Growth Hormone our body produces. The majority of our natural HGH production is known to occur during deep sleep. Because the body produces HGH during deep sleep, less hours of sleep and poor sleeping patterns result in a low production of HGH.  Sleep is one of the most important parts of our life. While our body is sleeping, our growth hormones are hard at work regenerating our cells and keeping us healthy. GHRH therapy can improve the quality of your sleep, leaving you with more energy during the day and allowing your body to get the work done that it needs to while you sleep.

Chronic sleep loss, which can contribute to health problems such as weight gain, high blood pressure, and a decrease in the immune system’s power, reports the Harvard Women’s Health Watch.

 

The Harvard Women’s Health Watch suggests six reasons you should get enough sleep:

 

  • Learning and memory: Sleep helps the brain commit new information to memory through a process called memory consolidation. In  studies, people who’d slept after learning a task did better on tests later. Sleep helps to restore the brain.

  • Metabolism and weight: Chronic sleep deprivation may cause weight gain by affecting the way our bodies process and store carbohydrates, and by altering levels of hormones that affect our appetite.

  • Safety: Sleep debt contributes to a greater tendency to fall asleep during the daytime. These lapses may cause falls and mistakes such as medical errors, air traffic mishaps, and road accidents.

  • Mood: Sleep loss may result in irritability, impatience, inability to concentrate, and moodiness. Too little sleep can also leave you too tired to do the things you like to do.

  • Cardiovascular health: Serious sleep disorders have been linked to hypertension, increased stress hormone levels, and irregular heartbeat.

  • Disease: Sleep deprivation alters immune function, including the activity of the body’s killer cells. Keeping up with sleep may also help fight cancer.

        

(http://www.health.harvard.edu/press_releases/importance_of_sleep_and_health)

 

Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, the stage of sleep when the most vivid dreams are dreamt, is important for the "unlearning" of superfluous memories. For example, when a child learns how to ride a bike and falls off the first ten times, finally successful on the eleventh try, the memory of how to perform the task so as to stay on the bike is the one which is important to retain, not the ones of how to fall off. Unlearning removes the unhelpful "how to" memories of how to fall off the bike, so that the next day when the child hops on it, she will automatically re-enact what she did that eleventh time, and not the first ten.

 

Want to improve your physical health? Get enough sleep. Sleep is a basic human need and a natural part of life. While it can be done for a while (and often is), functioning with only 3 or 4 hours of sleep each night will probably cause health problems in the future. This is because sleep is not an "option," it is something our bodies need to do daily. Even though the exact reasons for sleep remain a mystery, we do know that, during sleep, many of the body's major organ and regulatory systems continue to work actively. Some parts of the brain actually increase their activity dramatically, and the body produces more of certain hormones.

Sleepiness due to chronic lack of adequate sleep is a big problem in the United States and affects many children as well as adults. Children and even adolescents need at least 9 hours of sleep each night to do their best. Most adults need approximately 8 hours of sleep each night.

When we get less sleep (even one hour less) than we need each night, we develop a "sleep debt." If the sleep debt becomes too great, it can lead to problem sleepiness - sleepiness that occurs when you should be awake and alert, that interferes with daily routine and activities, and reduces your ability to function. Even if you do not feel sleepy, the sleep debt can have a powerful negative effect on your daytime performance, thinking, and mood, and cause you to fall asleep at inappropriate and even dangerous times.

Inadequate sleep can cause decreases in: performance, concentration, and reaction times. It can also cause increases in: memory lapses, accidents, injuries, behavior problems, and mood problems. An internal biological clock regulates the timing for sleep. It programs each person to feel sleepy during the nighttime hours and to be active during the daylight hours. A person who has not obtained adequate nighttime sleep is at high risk for symptoms of physical and/or mental impairment.

Problem sleepiness has serious consequences related to health and wealth. It puts adolescents and adults at risk for drowsy driving or workplace accidents. It may mean poor planning of meals and overspending. It increases the risk of poor social relationships, as well as, it effects our personal performance.

Sleep, like diet and exercise, is important for our minds and bodies to function normally. In fact, sleep appears to be required for survival. Rats deprived of sleep die within two to three weeks, a time frame similar to death due to starvation. So think about your daily sleep-wake cycle and try to get more sleep each night. Each small step you take will improve your health.

 

Sermorelin Therapy promotes longer, deeper sleep and improved sleeping patterns. Production of HGH during the sleep cycle becomes dramatically improved. This deep restful sleep and increased production of HGH enhances the body’s ability to better recover and regenerate from daily life and exercise.